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Pangolin Stories

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Celebrating the biggest conservation wins of 2016

The past year has shown us that when we work together, we can challenge the threats to nature and help ensure its ability to provide—for the sake of every living thing. Take a look at 2016 in review.

  • What is a pangolin?

    Often thought of as a reptile, pangolins are actually mammals. They are covered in distinctive scales that ward off predators in the wild. 

    tree pangolin
  • CITES: Big steps for wildlife

    October 01, 2016

    During the world’s largest ever wildlife trade meeting—the 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP17) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)—governments united behind a series of tough decisions to provide greater protection to a host of threatened species and bolster efforts to tackle soaring levels of poaching and wildlife trafficking.

    Head portrait of a Sumatran rhino
  • A massive win for the world’s most trafficked mammal

    September 28, 2016

    All legal trade of pangolins, the world’s most trafficked mammals, will soon end thanks to an international agreement to further protect the critically endangered species from extinction.

    Pangolin
  • Why CITES matters

    September 23, 2016

    One of the best tools we have for fighting the illegal wildlife trade that threatens many of the world’s most endangered species is CITES—the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.

    Siberian tiger walking in snow
  • Protecting pangolins from wildlife crime

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2016
    Pangolins defy the imagination—long, sleek, and covered head-to-toe in elegant scales. WWF Board Chair Neville Isdell and I revel in a shared quest to see a pangolin.
    Pangolin
  • Nighttime Wanderers: Nocturnal Animals from Around the World

    September 28, 2015

    As darkness falls in parts of the world, many of us begin to think about changing into pajamas and crawling into bed. But for some animals, the disappearance of the sun means their day is about to begin. Nocturnal species hunt, eat, and wander under the comfort of darkness. 

    Black-footed ferret