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Fuller Science for Nature Fund

Overview

The Kathryn Fuller Science for Nature Fund supports and harnesses the most promising conservation science research and puts it into practice. Named in honor of the former president and CEO of WWF-US, the fund supports an annual Science for Nature Symposium featuring global leaders in science, policy, and conservation. Additionally, a regular seminar series provides a regular forum for the conservation community.

Kathryn Fuller

Kathryn S. Fuller, former president and chief executive of World Wildlife Fund

What WWF Is Doing

2015 Fuller Symposium banner imageTiger © Talvinder Chohan/Alamy

2015 Fuller Science for Nature Symposium

Wired in the Wild
Can technology save the planet?

On November 18, 2015, the Fuller Symposium brought together thought leaders in science, policy, business, conservation and development to tackle the emerging issues facing our planet. This year’s symposium explored current uses of innovative technology and the promises and perils they present for addressing some of the planet's greatest challenges.

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Quarterly Seminar Series

WWF’s Science for Nature Seminars provide a regular forum for the conservation community to learn, discuss, network and inspire. The series seeks to advance the discussion of cutting edge research relating to international conservation by featuring distinguished scientists from across the globe. Seminars are:

  • Free
  • Open to the public
  • Held at WWF’s Washington, D.C. Headquarters (1250 24th St. NW, Washington, DC 20037)
  • Begin at 4:30 p.m., followed by a reception at 5:30 p.m.

For more information, contact Kate Graves at 202-495-4604.

Quarterly Seminar Series - April 2016

Maximizing conservation return on investment
Are we really achieving the impacts we want?

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When: April 14, 2016 at 4:30 pm. Reception to follow.  
Where: WWF-US Headquarters, Russell E. Train Conference Center
1250 24th Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20037

Across the globe, conservation organizations conduct projects with the intention of creating positive and avoiding negative impacts for both nature and people. But how much do we know about whether those goals are achieved? And can we improve the information base for future projects with limited resources? If so, when is that via “impact evaluation” versus other forms of information? In this seminar, Alex Pfaff will discuss mainstreaming improved information into conservation in order to make sure we are achieving the impacts we set out to achieve.

About Alex Pfaff
Professor of Public Policy, Economics and Environment and trained as an economist, Alex focuses on how the environment and natural resources, economic development, and a range of policies influence each other. He has studied impacts upon forests resulting from protected areas, environmental incentives, roads & railroads, and concessions & certification (in Brazil’s Amazon, Costa Rica, U.S., Panama, Madagascar, Mexico, Peru, Cameroon, Bolivia) as well as a range of institutional choices in water management (in Brazil’s Northeast, Colombia, Mexico), the drivers of harmful environmental exposures (in Bangladesh for groundwater arsenic, in China & Pakistan for indoor air quality) and the incentives for firms to self-audit and to disclose information (in the U.S.). This applied research aims to increase the chance that policies have their intended impacts on the environment, resources and affected groups.

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Quarterly Seminar Series - June 2016

Health in the Climate Crisis

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When: June 16, 2016 at 4:30 pm. Reception to follow.  
Where: WWF-US Headquarters, Russell E. Train Conference Center
1250 24th Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20037

As the climate changes, we can expect many impacts that pose threats to human health and well-being. Heat waves can be devastating to vulnerable populations and vector-borne diseases transmitted through mosquitoes are on the rise due to increasing temperatures. This presentation explores the health risks due to climate change, how they are identified, and the ways that cities address them. It is based on case studies of heat-related exposures, Valley Fever, and West Nile Virus, as well as a six city study of urban climate action in the United States.

About Sabrina McCormick
Sabrina McCormick, PhD, is a sociologist and filmmaker who investigates how to motivate climate mitigation and adaptation. Her recent research explores the health risks associated with climate change, how and why U.S. cities act on climate change, and the role that climate litigation plays in climate policy. Dr. McCormick has directed and produced several award-winning films, including her current film, Arara, set in the Brazilian Amazon, and two segments of the Emmy-winning Showtime series, The Years of Living Dangerously. McCormick has been a Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania and a AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow at the Environmental Protection Agency. She is the author of two books, and over fifty articles and book chapters. Dr. McCormick is Associate Professor in the Environmental and Occupational Health Department in the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University and Senior Fellow at the Wharton Risk and Decision Center.

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Projects

  • Kathryn S. Fuller Science for Nature Seminar Series

    WWF’s Science for Nature Seminars provide a regular forum for the conservation community to learn, discuss, network and inspire. The series seeks to advance the discussion of cutting edge research relating to critical topics in international conservation by featuring distinguished scientists from across the globe.

  • 2014 Fuller Symposium: Whole Planet, Full Plate

    The 2014 Fuller Symposium discussed how we can freeze the footprint of food while still nourishing billions. This one day event took place on November 12, 2014 at the National Geographic Society’s Grosvenor Auditorium in Washington, D.C.

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