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Deforestation and Forest Degradation Stories

flooded stairs WW2124571 Sean Rayford/Stringer

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  • Jaguar: the amazing Amazon big cat

    July 09, 2019

    Considered a protector and symbol of power, jaguars personify the mysterious beauty of the Amazon. This iconic species plays a vital role in its habitat by controlling other species’ populations and helping maintain a healthy ecosystem. 

    jaguar close WW2120938 Emmanuel Rondeau
  • What is forest degradation and why is it bad for people and wildlife?

    June 04, 2019

    When a forest is degraded it still exists, but it can no longer function well. It becomes a shell of its former self; its health declines until it can no longer support people and wildlife by, for example, filtering the air we breathe and water we drink or providing animals with food and places to live.

    degraded land WW286701 Tim Cornin
  • Smart fire management protects a park in Brazil

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2019
    The flames start out small and barely audible. But within 15 minutes they're two stories high—a roaring wall. It's Jose Luis Neris da Silva's job to make sure they don't burn out of control.
    Man in front of burning ground
  • Rooted in the Amazon

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2019
    In the Amazon and beyond, WWF’s Earth for Life vision calls for saving massive pieces of the planet we call home.
    Giant Otter peeks head out of the water while swimming in a small lake near the Rio do Coco in Parque Estadual do Cantão, Tocantins, Brazil.
  • These handmade cookstoves save fuel—and help save gorillas

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2019
    In 2008, WWF began working with groups in the Goma area to make and sell fuel-efficient cookstoves. Goma Stove, started with a loan from WWF, is now financially independent—and business is booming.
    veline Kahindo with clay stove base
  • A newly expanded park marks a conservation win in the Amazon

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2018
    Almost 70% of the deforestation in Colombia happens in its Amazonian forests.
    tapir winter2018
  • Legendary undercover investigators protect forests

    August 09, 2018

    The men in question can’t be named or pictured, because they’re undercover investigators for a deforestation watchdog group called Eyes on the Forest (EoF). And they’re routinely putting their safety on the line to protect Thirty Hills, one of the last great swaths of rainforest on the Indonesian island of Sumatra.

    EoF1 Neil Ever Osborne WW257110
  • Drones provide an up close look at the health of forests

    June 19, 2018

    WWF is on a mission to save the world’s forest land. Saving forests means using every tool at our disposal and working with partners around the globe. And that’s where drones come in to play.

    drone heads into forest
  • Sustainable ranching to protect a forest

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2018
    The Gran Chaco is the largest South American forest you’ve never heard of.
    Cattle at Medias Leguas ranch in Castelli, Chaco region, northern Argentina
  • An illegal logger in Tanzania becomes a forest defender

    March 21, 2018

    When his three daughters were hungry, Omary Mbunda would turn to illegal timber for money. That changed when the CARE-WWF Alliance—a partnership focused on creating food systems that better nourish vulnerable communities while supporting healthy ecosystems—began promoting sustainable forestry management and conservation agriculture in Mbondo in 2015.

    Portrait of Mbunda
  • As monarch butterflies lose ground in Mexico, WWF seeks solutions in America’s heartland

    When we think of wild animals losing their habitats, we usually envision elephants, rhinos, and tigers in faraway places. But monarch butterflies are losing their homes right here in the US—and our food is playing a part.

    Monarch among goldenrod
  • Women rising

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2018
    WWF is working to empower women by teaching them sustainable farming techniques, building their leadership and entrepreneurial skills, and ensuring their representation in decision-making bodies.
    IMGL8483-web-flipped
  • Fire-tailed titi monkey and pink river dolphin among 381 new species discovered in the Amazon

    The report, New Species of Vertebrates and Plants in the Amazon 2014-2015, details 381 new species that were discovered over 24 months, including 216 plants, 93 fish, 32 amphibians, 20 mammals, 19 reptiles and one bird.

    Pink river dolphin and calf.
  • WWF helps a mountain community protect forests and adapt to climate change

    July 31, 2017

    WWF recently concluded a project that worked closely with local communities to reduce land degradation, forest loss, and climate change vulnerability in the Himalayas in Nepal. Empowered by the Global Environment Facility, WWF worked directly with the government of Nepal to design and implement the project.

    A forest in Nepal.
  • Supporting communities and forests in Laos

    June 20, 2017

    The village of Sobphouan, with help from WWF, is a leading example of successful efforts in Laos to replace traditional agriculture and farming—drivers of widespread deforestation—with sustainable rattan production. 

    Aerial view of Rattan plantations
  • Kimberly Clark joins forces with WWF to engage consumers in helping to save the world's forests

    June 12, 2017

    Kimberly Clark and WWF have collaborated to raise awareness of the FSC logo and what it represents. 

    forest in peru
  • Broom grass transforms lives and hillsides in Nepal

    May 12, 2017

    In Nepal, broom grass is transforming steep, degraded slopes above the Trishuli and Seti rivers in the Aamdanda village. 

    Juni Maya Bhujel making brooms at her house.
  • In Nepal, cook stoves improve lives and help the environment

    May 12, 2017

    WWF and partners have launched a program to reduce pressure on forests and improve the lives of women and marginalized people through projects such as providing improved cook stoves that burn firewood more efficiently.

    A woman cooking with a metallic improved cook stove.
  • Arbor Day, FSC and America’s wood basket

    April 25, 2017

    On Arbor Day, we celebrate the important role trees play. We are working to increase FSC-certified land in the southeastern US, an area known as the "wood basket." 

    A forest landscape
  • Reducing China's environmental footprint

    In 2015, WWF and Apple kicked off a five-year project designed to help China reduce its environmental footprint by producing paper products from responsibly managed forests within its own borders.

    An aerial view of a eucalyptus forest in China
  • Improved cookstoves empower women in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    March 07, 2017

    Associations, some formed mainly of women, in the Democratic Republic of Congo are building new, improved cookstoves by hand to help the environment—and themselves.

    Womens Day 4
  • Living among the trees: Five animals that depend on forests

    January 23, 2017

    Forests are very important to us, and to many different species. WWF is working to address the threats to forests, and protect the species that call them home. Check out some of the animals who hang out in forests. 

    tree kangaroo portrait
  • Arrival of baby orangutan is a symbol of hope for conservation in Sumatra

    November 30, 2016

    One of the last great stands of rain forest in the deforestation hotspot of the Indonesian island of Sumatra has welcomed an exciting new addition: a baby female orangutan. The infant is the first orangutan born in the Thirty Hills conservation concession since WWF and its partners began managing the 100,000-acre forest in 2015.

    Orangutan Violet with her newborn baby
  • Community leaders work to protect Papua's forests and fight climate change

    November 09, 2016

    Community leaders in Papua are inspiring people to support the approach that local communities, WWF, and others are starting to use to save Papua’s forests—which are some of the largest remaining intact forests in Southeast Asia, but are increasingly at risk of being destroyed to make room for palm oil plantations, as well as mining and industrial logging operations.

    Alex Waisimon