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Celebrating the biggest conservation wins of 2017

As 2017 comes to a close, we’re taking a moment to highlight some of our biggest conservation successes of the year. And we couldn’t have done it without your support.

  • Saving a forest stronghold

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2018
    Deep within Africa’s second-largest country, Salonga is a core part of one of Earth’s greatest and last tropical forests, still virtually untouched by modern-day resource extraction and development.
    rangers paddle down a river in Salonga National Park
  • Charting a future for bonobos

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2018
    The future of bonobos in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is beginning to look promising. WWF is increasing surveillance of them and creating a management plan that benefits people and wildlife.
    Congo Bonobos Magazine Spring 2018
  • Women rising

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2018
    WWF is working to empower women by teaching them sustainable farming techniques, building their leadership and entrepreneurial skills, and ensuring their representation in decision-making bodies.
    IMGL8483-web-flipped
  • Protecting progress in the Brazilian Amazon

    December 13, 2017

    This will be one of the great litmus tests of the conservation movement: can we marshal the resources necessary to secure the gains we’ve made in the Amazon and chart a new path forward?

    Aerial view of Amazon
  • Creating a future for healthy forests in Bhutan

    November 11, 2017

    Bhutan now has a great means for bringing that commitment to life—long-term funding to ensure its protected areas, which cover half of the country, are properly managed forever. It is the first initiative of its kind in Asia and one of only a few in the world.

    Bhutanese mountains in sunset
  • A look at the natural world of Colombia

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2017
    Heritage Colombia is a conservation financing project designed to secure protections for Colombia’s natural landscapes.
    colombia map labels new winter2017
  • Heritage Colombia

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2017
    With the peace agreement comes the opportunity to restore the health of the country’s protected areas and prevent damage or loss to the many wild wonders that still exist.
    colomia birds winter2017
  • Fire-tailed titi monkey and pink river dolphin among 381 new species discovered in the Amazon

    The report, New Species of Vertebrates and Plants in the Amazon 2014-2015, details 381 new species that were discovered over 24 months, including 216 plants, 93 fish, 32 amphibians, 20 mammals, 19 reptiles and one bird.

    Pink river dolphin and calf.
  • WWF helps a mountain community protect forests and adapt to climate change

    July 31, 2017

    WWF recently concluded a project that worked closely with local communities to reduce land degradation, forest loss, and climate change vulnerability in the Himalayas in Nepal. Empowered by the Global Environment Facility, WWF worked directly with the government of Nepal to design and implement the project.

    A forest in Nepal.
  • Supporting communities and forests in Laos

    June 20, 2017

    The village of Sobphouan, with help from WWF, is a leading example of successful efforts in Laos to replace traditional agriculture and farming—drivers of widespread deforestation—with sustainable rattan production. 

    Aerial view of Rattan plantations
  • Kimberly Clark joins forces with WWF to engage consumers in helping to save the world's forests

    June 12, 2017

    Kimberly Clark and WWF have collaborated to raise awareness of the FSC logo and what it represents. 

    forest in peru
  • Arbor Day, FSC and America’s wood basket

    April 25, 2017

    On Arbor Day, we celebrate the important role trees play. We are working to increase FSC-certified land in the southeastern US, an area known as the "wood basket." 

    A forest landscape
  • Reducing China's environmental footprint

    In 2015, WWF and Apple kicked off a five-year project designed to help China reduce its environmental footprint by producing paper products from responsibly managed forests within its own borders.

    An aerial view of a eucalyptus forest in China
  • What animals live in the Amazon? And 8 other Amazon facts

    April 03, 2017

    The Amazon is an incredibly unique place. It is the world’s largest rain forest and river system, and the most biologically diverse place on Earth. It contains millions of species, most of them still undescribed. Learn more about this amazing place.

    aerial view of the amazon rainforest
  • On Lobby Day, WWF activists head to Capitol Hill to engage leaders on conservation issues

    March 15, 2017

    The halls of Congress came alive on Tuesday as dozens of WWF activists from across the country met with their representatives to advocate for international conservation funding on Lobby Day 2017.

    activists walk up steps to Congressional building
  • Improved cookstoves empower women in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    March 07, 2017

    Associations, some formed mainly of women, in the Democratic Republic of Congo are building new, improved cookstoves by hand to help the environment—and themselves.

    Womens Day 4
  • Bittersweet: chocolate's impact on the environment

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2017
    At least 2,000 years ago, people in the Americas began cultivating the cocoa tree for its dark, bitter beans, which they brewed into a drink spiced with hot peppers. Today, we blend the beans with milk and sugar and call the stuff chocolate.
    chocolate on a table
  • A tiny aircraft gives researchers a big-picture view of Thailand and Myanmar

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2017
    Conservationists have been working in the Dawna Tenasserim Landscape—which spans the Thailand/Myanmar border—for years. Rarely, though, do they get to see this magnificent wilderness area from the air.
    thailand paramotor spring2017
  • Living among the trees: Five animals that depend on forests

    January 23, 2017

    Forests are very important to us, and to many different species. WWF is working to address the threats to forests, and protect the species that call them home. Check out some of the animals who hang out in forests. 

    tree kangaroo portrait
  • Community leaders work to protect Papua's forests and fight climate change

    November 09, 2016

    Community leaders in Papua are inspiring people to support the approach that local communities, WWF, and others are starting to use to save Papua’s forests—which are some of the largest remaining intact forests in Southeast Asia, but are increasingly at risk of being destroyed to make room for palm oil plantations, as well as mining and industrial logging operations.

    Alex Waisimon
  • Put 'protecting the forest' on your holiday shopping list

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2016
    Products that carry the FSC logo have been certified to Forest Stewardship Council® standards as having been sourced according to specific standards of environmental and social responsibility.
    Forest Wooden Horse Takeaway Winter 2016 Magazine
  • Extreme weather threatens monarch butterfly habitat

    August 22, 2016

    Extreme weather caused by climate change is now a primary driver of forest degradation in key wintering habitat for monarch butterflies in Mexico, according to a new report.

    monarchs in trees in Mexico
  • Community voices help shape conservation program for the Democratic Republic of Congo

    August 10, 2016

    Local communities, Democratic Republic of Congo government representatives, WWF, and others met earlier this year to discuss plans for a forest conservation program in Maï-Ndombe.

    WWF is working in the Mai Ndombe region of the Democratic Republic of Congo to build community engagement in reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, also known as REDD+. Our aim, in collaboration with communities and governments, is
  • Addressing drought and other challenges in Mozambique

    August 02, 2016

    Participants of the weeklong workshop, which was hosted by WWF and the Natural Capital Project, learned how to map out Mozambique’s natural resources, why the resources are important, how to build them into decisions about infrastructure and development, and more.

    Mozambique is taking stock of its natural resources to better protect them for both wildlife and people.