Food Stories

  • Why seaweed farming matters in Maine

    April 22, 2021

    Fisher-farmers on the coast of Maine have recognized the opportunity seaweed offers. With much of their community reliant on a single industry—lobstering—and with climate change warming the waters of the Gulf of Maine faster than most other waters across the globe, seaweed farming offers an avenue for self-employed fishers to diversify their income, support the ecosystem on which they rely, and use equipment they already own.

    Matt Moretti on board ship harvests kelp off coast of Maine
  • Supercharge your soil with kitchen food scraps

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2021
    Composting may sound like hard, messy work. But done right, it can be a simple (and even tidy) way to benefit your garden and the planet.
    Illustration of apple tree with compost beneath
  • Eating for our planet

    October 09, 2020

    The way in which we produce and consume food is pushing our planet to the brink. Learn five changes that we can all make to our diets to help improve the health of our planet through our daily eating habits.

    A female farmer with a box of fresh vegetables walks along her field
  • Blazhka Dimitrova wants to inspire a zero-waste world

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2020
    In 2020, Dimitrova had transformed her catering company into Blagichka-Zero Waste, the first zero-waste restaurant in Bulgaria.
    Bulgaria restaurant window with hanging plants
  • Small steps to reduce food waste

    April 01, 2020

    Right now, reducing waste is ever more important and we can all look at how to do that in our own kitchens.

    a refrigerator shelf
  • Food security in an uncertain time

    As the world is facing a global health crisis, the foundations of our food system are also called into question, along with the interactions between people and the natural resources we all depend on.

    Picking tomatoes
  • Last Call for Food combats food waste and food insecurity

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2020
    What if there was a way to combat both food waste and food insecurity with a single solution? From this, Last Call was born.
    Erin McGeoy
  • 5 ways harmful fisheries subsidies impact coastal communities

    November 21, 2019

    Our planet’s health—and our own well-being—is dependent on a vibrant ocean rich with nature, like fish! While sustainable fishing can be an effective way to keep our oceans healthy, one big barrier is standing in the way: taxpayer-funded support for unsustainable fishing operations.

    Fishermen on artisanal fishing boats, out at sea, Tema, Ghana.
  • Food Waste Warriors

    In the spring of 2019, WWF, with support from The Kroger Co. Foundation and the US EPA, looked at post-service food waste in 46 schools in nine US cities across eight states. This is what they found.

    Food Waste Education Program by the World Wildlife Fund at Seaton Public Elementary School in Washington, DC, United States of America
  • The food-climate connection

    October 16, 2019

    It seems obvious, but sometimes we need a reminder. Food comes from nature. So everything we eat has an impact on the planet—from how it's grown, to how its packaged, to how it gets where it’s going, how it's cooked, and at the end of the meal, where it winds up (say, your tummy, the trash or a compost pile).

    Food at market
  • Milk's impact on the environment

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2019
    Today milk, butter, cheese, yogurt, ice cream, and other dairy products are ubiquitous, consumed by more than 6 billion people worldwide. WWF is working to limit its impact on the environment.
    Cow
  • A wake-up call on agriculture’s role in climate change

    August 08, 2019

    The connection between food and land use and global climate change is the subject of a special report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a United Nations body that assesses the science of climate change for the benefit of global policymakers. IPCC’s August 2019 report focuses especially on the impact of agriculture—with good reason.

    Iowa agricultural land.
  • July 4th and food waste: Some tips from our Founding Fathers

    George Washington, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson wrote passionately about the value of using food scraps and other waste items to fertilize soil. Here are a few tips to lower your food footprint during the summer holidays.

    Family at backyard cookout
  • How can we make farmed seafood more sustainable?

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2019
    Focusing on shrimp and salmon, WWF is working to improve aquaculture practices through tech innovations like forensic analysis of farmed products and traceability software.
    20 percent of the fish harvested from the ocean are used to feed farmed fish
  • Eating a variety of foods is good for you—and the planet

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2019
    Americans, on average, consume more fats and oils, added sugar and sweeteners, proteins, and grains than recommended. Overconsumption of foods like these affects the planet.
    Food on a mobile
  • One way to tackle food waste? Eat more of what we grow.

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2019
    While most loss or waste of food takes place in restaurants, hotels, grocery stores, or our own kitchens, crops that go unharvested on farms are a piece of the puzzle, too.
    Close-up of romaine lettuce
  • The next Dust Bowl? Great Plains grassland loss slows overall, but rises in South Dakota

    WWF’s latest annual study of the extent and impact of conversion of grasslands to croplands reveals that though such activity activity generally declined across the Great Plains in 2017, it has nearly doubled in South Dakota within the same time span.
    A tractor in a field
  • 5 ways to shop and eat smarter for the climate

    As shoppers and eaters, we have immense power to save habitats, fight climate change, and keep our planet livable by taking simple actions at home and in stores every day. Here are five steps you can take right now.

    A boy in a market in Bhutan
  • WWF examines the loss of produce on farms and pathways to change

    August 21, 2018

    Did you know that food loss can occur long before you even buy it? WWF zoomed in on 35 farms across the country to assess how much produce never leaves the field after harvest. 

    Peaches in a tree
  • Congratulations, Bahamas! We Did It!

    August 07, 2018

    The Bahamas’ lobster fishers just earned certification from the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) for managing their fishery sustainably. The MSC certification helps ensure that the fishery can continue to produce food and jobs for current and future generations.

    fisherman and lobster Mac Stone WW1103815
  • A missing piece in the fight against climate change

    Keeping trees, grasses, and soil intact and restoring them can help get us a long way toward meeting America's urgent climate goals.

    Rockhills Ranch, South Dakota
  • Love lobster tails? Thank The Bahamas’ Mia Isaacs

    As president of the Bahamas Marine Exporters Association and managing director of Heritage Seafood, a leading lobster processor, Mia is working with her fellow exporters, fishermen, the Bahamian government, and international NGOs like WWF and The Nature Conservancy to ensure lobsters are fished sustainably. 

    Spiny Lobster
  • As monarch butterflies lose ground in Mexico, WWF seeks solutions in America’s heartland

    When we think of wild animals losing their habitats, we usually envision elephants, rhinos, and tigers in faraway places. But monarch butterflies are losing their homes right here in the US—and our food is playing a part.

    Monarch among goldenrod
  • How cover crops help keep soil healthy and productive

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2018
    Food production is a leading driver of habitat loss, overfishing, and freshwater consumption. Yet the habitat under the most direct pressure from agriculture is also the most ignored: soil.
    field of clover