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  • Bittersweet: chocolate's impact on the environment

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2017
    At least 2,000 years ago, people in the Americas began cultivating the cocoa tree for its dark, bitter beans, which they brewed into a drink spiced with hot peppers. Today, we blend the beans with milk and sugar and call the stuff chocolate.
    chocolate on a table
  • Will there be enough fish to feed the world in 2050?

    January 13, 2017

    The world must do more to sustainably manage fishing if we’re to address increasing global demand for protein in the coming decades. If the situation doesn’t improve, millions of people may no longer be able to afford fish by 2050. 

    Disappointingly small catch of Southern hake
  • Look for the label: Shopping for sustainable food

    October 25, 2016

    By choosing certified sustainable foods, you can send a message to your favorite grocery stores and brands that sustainability matters to you. Just look for the follow ecolabels that identify responsibly produced foods. And if you can’t find them, ask your favorite retailers and brands to start selling certified sustainable products.

    woman shops for groceries
  • Fight climate change by preventing food waste

    October 13, 2016

    One-third of all the food produced goes to waste. Food waste is both a humanitarian concern and drives climate change. Here are some tips to prevent food waste. 

    Avocados and bananas for sale
  • Experiencing a feast for the senses in Cuba

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2016
    Taking in the spectacular view from our table at Finca Agroecologica El Paraiso, it was hard to imagine the day getting any better—until lunch was served.
    Cuba hotel horizon Winter 2016 Magazine
  • Reimagine your refrigerator to help freeze the footprint of your food

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2016
    Reimagine your refrigerator to help freeze the footprint of your food
    Refrigerator
  • Making shrimp sustainable in Thailand

    Shrimp farming is associated with mangrove destruction, water pollution, and illegal fishing and labor practices, but WWF is working with some of the world’s most innovative and conscientious farmers to demonstrate that shrimp production can be environmentally sustainable, socially responsible, and economically viable.

    farming shrimp
  • Ice cream's impact on the environment

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2016
  • Sea turtles and shrimp cocktail: what’s the connection?

    Sea turtles are some of the most majestic, long-living animals in the ocean, yet hundreds of thousands of them are accidentally caught and die in shrimp nets and other fishing gear each year. Endangered loggerheads, green turtles, and leatherbacks are especially vulnerable.

    tiger and pesto
  • Sumatran elephants and instant noodles: what’s the connection?

    Sumatran elephants are pretty adorable. Yet across Indonesia, they’re losing their forest homes to the unsustainable production of palm oil.

    590x480 Elephant Noodles Food Pairings
  • Tigers and pesto: what’s the connection?

    With flavor as bright as its color, pesto is a delicious treat. But pine nuts are a key food for the Amur tiger’s main prey. If we consume pine nuts faster than the trees can replenish, we’re taking away food from tiger’s prey and, ultimately, tigers.

    tiger and pesto
  • Bag of pet food
  • foodchain-final-revise (2000x1429)
  • How to reduce food waste this holiday season

    December 15, 2015

    If you’re passionate about conservation, consider this: preventing and reducing food waste is one of the best things you can do to conserve natural resources and wildlife. Check out these tips to avoid tossing food in the trash this holiday season. 

    pies cooling
  • Solutions for a hot, crowded, and hungry world

    December 08, 2015

    Energy production is the largest source of these emissions, but agriculture contributes a significant share—about 24%, according to the World Resources Institute. Clearly, improving the way we produce food is critical in the fight against climate change.

    farming in kenya
  • Celebrating our conservation successes of 2015

    Every so often, it’s important to pause, take a step back, and celebrate the progress we’ve made together in conserving the world’s wildlife and beautiful places. And this year gave us much to applaud. Though our conservation challenges persist and there’s still much work to be done, we all need take a moment to appreciate just how far we’ve come by working in tandem to protect the planet we love.

    african elephants in KAZA
  • Working together for the future of food

    November 11, 2015

    Feeding the world and protecting the precious resources that all life on Earth require is no easy feat. That’s why WWF and our partners brought together such a diverse group of people to “game out” how we can balance these needs even in the direst situations.

    team india discussion
  • Producing better palm oil for people, profits, and the planet

    There’s a way we can have our palm oil and eat it too. By producing palm oil sustainably, growers and manufacturers can offer traders, retailers, investors, and consumer products that meet their needs in a way that’s good for the planet, people, and profits.

    palm oil close up
  • A Salmon Scientist on Protecting Streams

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2015
    Dr. Carol Ann Woody captures a tiny salmon as part of a comprehensive study of Alaska’s fish species.
  • Soy: The Biggest Food Crop We Never Talk About

    WWF Magazine: Winter 2015
    It has slipped quietly into much of what we consume—and its production is straining ecosystems around the world.
    Soybeans
  • Investing in a Food-Secure Future

    October 16, 2015

    To sustain our planet’s natural resources for future generations, WWF is working with leading food producers, traders, processors and retailers to produce food more efficiently—using land, water, and energy more efficiently, and releasing less waste and greenhouse gas. This work is challenging enough, and it’s complicated further by climate change and population growth.

    wheat field
  • Can we feed the world and protect the planet?

    September 04, 2015

    Building on a seven year-old pilot program in Mozambique, the CARE-WWF Alliance is now exploring opportunities to advance environmentally, socially and economically sustainable food production systems in Tanzania and Zambia.

    sunset in kafue
  • Endangered species threatened by unsustainable palm oil production

    The world’s most popular vegetable oil—palm oil—is produced in tropical rain forests around the world. While it can be produced sustainably, conventional production methods and unchecked agricultural expansion threaten these forests and the wildlife that call them home.

    orangutan