Toggle Nav

Forests Stories

  • Community voices help shape conservation program for the Democratic Republic of Congo

    August 10, 2016

    Local communities, Democratic Republic of Congo government representatives, WWF, and others met earlier this year to discuss plans for a forest conservation program in Maï-Ndombe.

    WWF is working in the Mai Ndombe region of the Democratic Republic of Congo to build community engagement in reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, also known as REDD+. Our aim, in collaboration with communities and governments, is
  • Addressing drought and other challenges in Mozambique

    August 02, 2016

    Participants of the weeklong workshop, which was hosted by WWF and the Natural Capital Project, learned how to map out Mozambique’s natural resources, why the resources are important, how to build them into decisions about infrastructure and development, and more.

    Mozambique is taking stock of its natural resources to better protect them for both wildlife and people.
  • Human. Nature.

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2016
    A Wae Ma Gite villager on his way to fish squids in the sea.
  • Beyond Monkoto Road

    June 13, 2016

    Thirty years later, WWF's Kate Newman returns to find signs of elephants, bonobos and more in Salonga National Park

    boats in Salonga National Park
  • New hope for Africa's largest forest park

    May 30, 2016

    As the second largest tropical forest park in the world, Salonga is a global treasure. It is home for bonobos and one of the last remaining habitats for the forest elephant. Now, a newly signed agreement brings together the Congolese Institute for Nature Conservation (ICCN) and WWF to co-manage the protected area.

    ranger in Salonga National Park
  • Understanding and improving the pulp and paper market in China

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2016
    Forests all over the world have been harvested illegally or irresponsibly to meet escalating demand for pulp and paper.
    Freshly cut wood at a paper mill in Tengzhou, China
  • Survey suggests migratory monarchs are rebounding—with a long road ahead

    February 26, 2016

    A new survey conducted last December indicates migratory monarch butterfly populations grew in 2015, occupying almost 10 acres of forest in their hibernation sites in Mexico. Though this shows a boost from the previous two years, the numbers are considerably low compared to 20 years ago.

    monarch on flower
  • Managing the forest factory

    Eduardo Escompani Viñas is a shiringuero; he collects natural latex from shiringa trees. He and the other members of ECOMUSA, a cooperative of natural rubber producers, feel duty-bound to protect their natural resources and their way of life. They demonstrate that there are ways to reap the value and benefit of forests without harming them.

     

    Man getting latex from a tree
  • Financing conservation

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2016
    WWF’s plan to secure a permanent future for some of the highest-priority protected areas on Earth
    Project Finance illustration
  • Capturing atmospheric data in the Amazon

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2016
    Capturing atmospheric data in the Amazon
    ATTO tower in the Amazon
  • WWF’s two-part plan to save the Javan rhino

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2016
    WWF’s approach is based in the fact that when geographically bound rhino populations reach the limit of numbers their habitat can support, reproduction drops.
    Javan Rhino
  • Flavors of Nature: Food from the protected areas of Peru

    A growing number of cooks in Peru rely on the country’s protected areas—parks, nature reserves, and sanctuaries—to keep their menus vibrant and their customers satisfied. That's part of why WWF is working with the Peruvian government and partners to fund the proper management of protected areas.

    chef cooking in Peru
  • Celebrating our conservation successes of 2015

    Every so often, it’s important to pause, take a step back, and celebrate the progress we’ve made together in conserving the world’s wildlife and beautiful places. And this year gave us much to applaud. Though our conservation challenges persist and there’s still much work to be done, we all need take a moment to appreciate just how far we’ve come by working in tandem to protect the planet we love.

    african elephants in KAZA
  • Protecting a forest across generations

    November 19, 2015

    US forest landowners play a huge role in saving the world’s forests. One way they can do so is by getting their land certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC). Learn how Stacey Locke did this—in collaboration with WWF, Domtar and others—and why her family’s forest in Arkansas is now a model for landowners across the Southeast.

    top of a pine tree
  • What is FSC certification—and is it working?

    What does the FSC® logo mean to you? Can you even name the type of products it references? Here’s the answer: the logo represents the Forest Stewardship Council®—and it signifies that the wood or paper product originated from a forest that was managed carefully with trees, animals, and local community benefit at heart.

    Forest in Ecuador
  • Collaborating to permanently protect Peru's natural treasures

    Public, private, national, and international partners, including WWF, are working on a way to fund the permanent protection of Peru’s natural treasures. Such funds could be used to conduct wildlife surveys, create jobs in ecotourism, and purchase equipment that enables park rangers to better patrol protected areas.

    forest in peru
  • Waterfall in Costa Rica
  • Stopping Illegal Logging in Africa

    September 10, 2015

    Many wood products in American homes—from the kitchen table to hardwood floors—come from the same forested areas in Africa where elephants, rhinos, lions and other magnificent species roam wild. Few purchasers know that the wood from these forests is illegal. It was harvested, transported, processed, bought or sold in violation of national laws.

    forest in kenya
  • Twenty-Five Years in the Amazon

    August 25, 2015

    WWF's Meg Symington describes the luck and rewards of working to save the Amazon rain forest.

    Amazon
  • Endangered species threatened by unsustainable palm oil production

    The world’s most popular vegetable oil—palm oil—is produced in tropical rain forests everywhere. While it can be produced sustainably, palm oil made with conventional production methods can lead to unchecked agricultural expansion that threatens forests and wildlife.

    orangutan
  • Saving Thirty Hills

    August 12, 2015

    The Indonesian island of Sumatra—one of the most biodiverse places on the planet—has lost more than half of its forest cover in the last thirty years. But there are stands of amazing, still-intact forest in Sumatra, and Thirty Hills is one of them.

    Thirty Hills, Sumatra
  • What is REDD+?

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2015
  • Deforestation in Peru

    WWF Magazine: Fall 2015
    How indigenous communities, government agencies, nonprofits and businesses work together to stop the clearing of forests
    Rain drenched village in Peru
  • Forests, Climate Change and the Role Green Giants Play

    July 07, 2015

    Remember learning about photosynthesis back in school? This week, let’s go back to our science roots (pun unintended!) to see how this natural process makes forests both a contributor and solution to climate change. To understand the complex relation between forests and climate change, it is important to see trees and plants as playing multiple roles on the stage that is our planet.

    Cameroon Forest