Wildlife Conservation Stories

  • Partnering for America's Plains

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2016
    How WWF helped assemble a broad coalition of people to conserve the Northern Great Plains
    The sun shines through clouds on the plains
  • Gathering new intelligence on gorillas

    WWF Magazine: Summer 2016
    A new census in Virunga aids in conservation
    Young gorilla and its mother
  • How big is the Arctic Ocean? And eight other Arctic facts

    The Arctic Ocean is about 5.4 million square miles—about 1.5 times as big as the US—but it is the world’s smallest ocean. Learn more about the Arctic and what WWF is doing to help protect it.

    Polar bear and cub
  • Major elephant ivory trafficking network broken up in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    February 11, 2016

    In a significant blow to the illegal ivory trade in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), authorities dismantled a major elephant ivory trafficking syndicate thanks to a law enforcement supported by WWF and partners.

    Guard with hand held GPS device for recording gorilla locations
  • Five countries work toward a common goal in southern Africa

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2016
    Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA)
    Elephants walking in KAZA
  • A promising future for Africa's wildlife

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2016
    At dusk, hundreds of elephants move through the brush near the Kwando River’s famous “horseshoe” bend  in eastern Namibia.
  • Photographing Africa's most elusive animals

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2016
    In a landscape largely undocumented by science, a researcher and a photographer team up to illuminate more than the night
    Male Lion in camera trap
  • Protecting pangolins from wildlife crime

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2016
    Pangolins defy the imagination—long, sleek, and covered head-to-toe in elegant scales. WWF Board Chair Neville Isdell and I revel in a shared quest to see a pangolin.
    Pangolin
  • Can dairy cows in Maryland help protect rhinos in East Africa?

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2016
    In other words: Can livestock in the United States help us test thermal camera technology slated to protect rhinos in East Africa?
    Thermal video camera
  • Empty Quarter sand dunes, Saudi Arabia
  • WWF’s two-part plan to save the Javan rhino

    WWF Magazine: Spring 2016
    WWF’s approach is based in the fact that when geographically bound rhino populations reach the limit of numbers their habitat can support, reproduction drops.
    Javan Rhino
  • What’s black and orange and in the wild?

    On Halloween, we’re all searching through our clothing for the perfect black and orange outfit. Some animals in the wild already sport the colors. From swimming the seas to flying through the skies, these creatures don Halloween fashion all year round.

    Monarch Butterfly
  • Where do tigers live? And other tiger facts

    Tigers are the most iconic of the big cats. With their gorgeous black-and-orange coats and long, white whiskers, they invoke in many a feeling of wonder and admiration. But though they are adored, they’re also vulnerable to extinction. 

    Bengal tiger on a creek bank
  • Thailand Destroys Elephant Ivory Stockpile

    August 25, 2015

    Over two tons of elephant tusks, carved ivory, and trinkets in Thailand—most of it from elephants poached a continent away in Africa—made its way into a machine that ground the ivory into chips. The solemn ceremony to destroy Thailand’s illegal ivory follows a number of important laws the country passed to crack down on the illegal elephant ivory trade.

    prepping ivory to crush
  • Elephant Ivory Crush in New York City

    June 19, 2015

    An enormous machine roared to life pulverizing more than one ton of illegal elephant ivory tusks, trinkets and souvenirs in the heart of New York City today. The ivory crush in Times Square sent a dramatic message to the world that the United States will not tolerate elephant ivory trafficking. 

    african elephant
  • Crush and Burn: Destroying Illegal Elephant Ivory

    May 29, 2015

    Several countries, including China, have recently joined the US in publicly destroying their illegal elephant ivory stockpiles—a powerful act demonstrating that a country will not tolerate wildlife crime. The act ensures that stockpiles of seized ivory will never again be sold and affirms that elephant ivory is only of value if it remains on elephants as nature intended. And these burns and crushes also bring global attention to a problem threatening not only elephants and other wildlife, but also national development and regional stability.

    ivory burn in Gabon
  • Rare Video of Amur Tiger Family

    February 19, 2015

    Footage of a tiger and her playful cubs caught by a WWF camera trap is the first video evidence of wild Amur tigers in China. The footage was captured almost 20 miles from the Russian border late last year. In the past, tiger footprints were the only indicators of Amur tigers in China.

    Amur tiger family in China
  • Longing for Love

    February 05, 2015

    The romantic ideal of finding one mate for life is primarily a human aspiration. Animals which are believed to "mate for life" comprise only a handful of species.

    penguins touching wings
  • Finding love in the wild

    From the underwater dance of seahorses to the enthusiastic leg-lifts of the peacock spider, the animal kingdom is full of quirky and intriguing methods to impress the opposite sex.

    prairie chicken mating dance
  • Thai Citizens Say No to Elephant Ivory

    January 27, 2015

    With demand for elephant ivory at an all-time high, the campaign asks people to imagine a life without elephants by publicly removing the Thai letter representing elephants—“Chor Chang”—from their names. The Thai word for elephant, “Chang,” starts with the letter in the Thai alphabet called “Chor”. By removing Chor Chang from their names, Thai people are making a statement that they want the illegal trade in elephant ivory to stop or their beloved national animal—the elephant—could disappear.

    African elephants at watering hole
  • lisa steel
  • How bison survive winter in the Northern Great Plains

    Despite roaming vast distances in the Northern Great Plains, bison do not move south as the weather grows cold and inhospitable, though they may move to lower elevations where snow is not so deep. Temperatures plummet well below zero, bitter winds whip across the landscape, and bison still remain.

    bison covered in snow
  • More Tigers in American Backyards than in the Wild

    July 29, 2014

    One of the world’s largest populations of tigers exists not in the wild—but in captivity in the United States. With an estimated 5,000 tigers, the U.S. captive tiger population exceeds the approximately 3,200 tigers in the wild. 

    Captive Tiger
  • Citizen Scientists Saving Snow Leopards

    July 15, 2014

    WWF has found a way to protect the snow leopard while also benefiting nomadic herders. As part of the USAID-funded Conservation and Adaptation in Asia’s High Mountain Landscapes and Communities (AHM) project, local herders like Byambatsooj are now being trained and equipped to collect basic data on the remote mountains they know better than anyone else.

    camera trap set up